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someone

Used for referring to a person when you do not know or do not say who the person is.

So in the sentence:

I will need someone from different continents who can help me to spread this application and you are the first person that I approach.

Should the pronoun someone be plural and does it even have a plural form?

Or.. Should I just use the word people to replace the pronoun?

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Related english.stackexchange.com/q/56625/11762 – yoozer8 Mar 30 '12 at 3:35
    
"... the first person [that] I have approached." – ErikE Mar 30 '12 at 5:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Someone, and indeed any indefinite pronoun that ends in "one" is always singular. The word people is a good choice; however, the second part of your compound sentence sounds as if you are talking to only one person. You may want to restructure the sentence to reflect this.

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The plural you want for this case is "some people".

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4  
... or just "people", thus "I will need people from different continents who, etc." – Eugene Seidel Mar 30 '12 at 8:45

Occasionally we see someones
From the OED:

J. Curtis (1936). There's someone on that roof all right. Two someones.

.

J. Masefield (1927). He had no sooner wished, than invisible someones came silently, blocked up the approach to Otter's lair,...

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