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I'm a bit confused with the usage of the prepositions for the word globalization.

Should I say:

In order to achieve globalization of digitization...

or

In order to achieve globalization for digitization...

or

In order to achieve globalization on digitization...

or something more applicable?

PS: I'm developing a facebook app that's like Branchout. However, instead of finding jobs, networking professionally, and recruiting employees, this app is about meeting new people - it is a combination of a dating site, Branchout, an internet forum and anything you can think of that have to do with interacting with strangers. It connects people together in different ways. (As the application is still under development, I can't tell you about the key ingredient that digitizes people's lives. Just bear in mind that this is the digitization I am talking about.)

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Are you working on a new keyboard types? –  user19148 Mar 30 '12 at 5:50
3  
I don't think you say it at all! In order to achieve global use of digital equipment (or whatever your phrase actually means) is far better. –  Andrew Leach Mar 30 '12 at 7:56
    
@Carlo_R. No. But an application. –  user19341 Mar 31 '12 at 4:25
    
@AndrewLeach Probably true. But my question here is, what prepositions can be used for the word Globalization ? –  user19341 Mar 31 '12 at 4:27
    
globalization on, globalization for, globalization of. All seem fine to me. That's why I am confused. –  user19341 Mar 31 '12 at 4:38
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2 Answers 2

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It's definitely of, because it's genitive. Consider replacing the two nouns:

In order to achieve the use of keys...
In order to achieve the correct delivery of mail...

You couldn't use on or for in both of those examples. The last word in each (and in your example) is the patient of the agent noun.

You do have a problem with digitization though. Inasmuch as that's a word at all, it means making into digits. You probably want digitalization, "making digital," but I'd still recommend changing the way you say that. It's an ugly word. You might consider "this use of computing" or "this use of computers".

I can't tell you about the key ingredient that digitizes people's lives. Just +bear in mind that this is the +digitalization I am talking about.

Lives could be digitized — although that's a really impersonal, functional way of talking about people — but the nouns do differentiate. It's a quirk. (And it's "bear in mind" — to carry in one's mind.)

I can't tell you about the key ingredient that puts this aspect of people's lives online. Just bear in mind that this is the use of computing I am talking about.

...Globalization of this use of computing...

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Without more of a context and a definition of what you mean by digitization, I can only hazard a guess. I would go with of digitization.

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