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Suppose I know a lot of people in a particular place — let's say, Singapore — and they can help me.

How can I express it through a short sentence to let someone know that he has found the right person for spreading his products?

Should I say:

I have a good network in Singapore.

or

I have good connections in Singapore.

or something more applicable?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When talking about business associates or the like, the two words have similar meanings. But "network" generally has the connotation of an organization, where "connections" means a bunch of individual people.

So if what you mean is that on various trips to Singapore you have met people whom you can call upon for favors, etc, you would say you have "connections". But if you visited Singapore and hired many people, or established offices all over the city, then you might say you have a "network". We talk about a company building a "network of sales offices" throughout a region, or a country establishing a "network of spies" in a hostile nation.

People do sometimes use "network" to talk about casual business contacts, but when they do they usually are referring to a set of contacts carefully and deliberately built up. Like someone might say, "It's not enough to just have a few connections in the airline industry. You need to build a network of reliable contacts."

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I agree. Each person/contact over there is a connection. A "network", to me, would imply that the connections are connected to each other. –  Jim Mar 30 '12 at 3:36

Besides connections and network as mentioned in the question. consider contacts; the wiktionary example is

The salesperson had a whole binder full of contacts for potential clients.

You might also refer to a roster of clients.

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Good connections is a good choice. Network brings to mind the electronic variety, and it connotes more of a setup, which isn't what you're trying to convey.

15. Usually, connections. associates, relations, acquaintances, or friends, especially representing or having some influence or power: European connections; good connections in Congress.

I would choose the second:

I have good connections in Singapore.

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