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I read the following on a website and I was wondering if it was okay? Because the books only talk about the standard three forms. What would it mean if we changed the second part of the statement to 'wouldn't have been'?

If we talk about a past action and its result in the present we use if + past perfect and would not + infinitive:

If he hadn't done well on the training courses, he wouldn't be a Project leader now.

At the same time what is the different between the following:

If you had gone over that question in your note-book, would you be able to answer question No. 2?

If you had gone over that question in your note-book, would you have been able to answer question No. 2?

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  • If he hadn't done well on the training courses, he wouldn't be a Project Leader now.

The key word is now. He is now Project Leader but would not now be Project Leader if he hadn't done well, etc.

Imagine that he was Project Leader, but is Project Leader no longer. He is not Project Leader now. Then it is correct to say:

  • If he hadn't done well on the training courses, he wouldn't have been Project Leader.

The same principle applies to your other examples:

  • If you had gone over that question in your note-book, would you be able to answer question No. 2?

This is a question about what you would be able to do now.

  • If you had gone over that question in your note-book, would you have been able to answer question No. 2?

This is a question about what you would have been able to do then.

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Could the second clause be in simple present and simple future? For example, If you had come here before, will you be able to show me the area around? Or If you were in that meeting, you probably know many things. –  Noah Mar 30 '12 at 3:31
    
Or is that the only exception in conditional statements? –  Noah Mar 30 '12 at 3:42
    
If I am sending an email where I need to include something that I haven't done for example, I haven't completed the completed the project report yet. I would have sent it to you if I had completed it Am I using the correct tense? –  Noah May 10 '12 at 4:35
    
The tenses are correct. –  Shoe May 10 '12 at 10:57
    
What if I use "I would send it to you if I completed it" What is the difference between this and the past perfect version(in this context)? –  Noah May 10 '12 at 17:14
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