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I would really need help with the following sentence.

The significance of culture and identity in development has to do not so much with the cultural factor in the process of development as with abandoning Eurocentric development thinking, i.e. development as catching up and imitation, and instead conceiving and conceptualizing development as an inclusive, liberating process, in which different worldviews are accommodated and constitute a dialogical process.

The and instead part confuses me. Instead of what? I cannot understand what it relates to. I read that instead can be used without of but still means of that. It does not make any sense in this case.

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closed as too localized by Robusto, KitFox, jwpat7, RegDwigнt Mar 27 '12 at 12:26

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As previously noted, that sentence is not well-written. Why are you asking about it again? -1 –  jwpat7 Mar 26 '12 at 18:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The instead here refers to conceiving and conceptualizing development as an inclusive, liberating process instead of Eurocentric development thinking (catching up and imitation).

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1  
Does not make sense with "and" in this case –  Pietro Mar 26 '12 at 8:28
    
Yes, but this says ..., and instead conceiving.. I think it really relates to the sentence "abandoning..". –  Pietro Mar 26 '12 at 8:33
    
Oh I see, you were not reffering to the sentence beginning with "i.e" but because you used its content, I thought you joined that "and instead" to this sentence (development as catching up and imitation, and instead conceiving and conceptualizing - that would not make sense) –  Pietro Mar 26 '12 at 8:37
    
@Pietro Will's example was not exactly parallel to the given sentence, but it holds up if we make it parallel: the smell in the room had to do with our abandoning apples and instead eating bananas. –  phoog Mar 26 '12 at 23:51

"... abandoning Eurocentric development thinking, ..., and instead conceiving and conceptualizing development as an inclusive, liberating process, in which different worldviews are accommodated..."

The "instead" phrase contrasts Eurocentricity with a more pluralistic attitude. It may be helpful to mentally gloss over the comma-delimited "i.e." phrase.

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Thanks I think I got it - so it is like: ...and instead (of that - that refers to abandoning Eurocentric development thinking), conceiving... right? –  Pietro Mar 26 '12 at 8:32
    
Right - in favor of different worldviews. –  Rick Mar 26 '12 at 19:10

The sentence would be probably be clear enough in speech with intonation and rhythm available, but the structure doesn't shine through in writing with all that adipose text hung on it and only punctuation to patch with. Let's dissect the key chunk:

*has to do [not so much with the cultural factor in the process of development as] with abandoning [Eurocentric development] thinking [, i.e. development as catching up and imitation,] and instead conceiving and conceptualizing [development] *

by leaving out the bracketed pieces or substituting variables for them

has to do with abandoning thinking [that way] and instead conceiving and conceptualizing [this way]

Note that the boldfaced conjoined gerund clauses are parallel in structure -- both are objects of the idiom have ... to do with -- and in form -- both are gerund phrases with indefinite (but coreferential) subjects. The instead is perfectly natural as part of the conjoined NP structure, after and at the beginning of the clause, although it could just as easily go at the end of the clause, after [this way].

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