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What are the types of uses of the expression "to canter through a topic or issue"? I heard it in this context:

I don't have much time to go through this section now, so I'll canter through the next few pages and concentrate on explaining the subsequent section.

Does this use of the expression have an implication of "not being bothered" to explain something in more detail, and so, with the possibility of having a negative connotation to it?

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A canter is an easy gallop (Dictionary.com), a word generally used of horses.

The author here is using the term figuratively to describe the rate at which he will go through the section. He's saying that he will go through it quickly because he doesn't have the time to dwell on it, and it's not as pertinent to the subject at hand as the subsequent section. There's no negativity implied.

A good synonym for canter through in this context would be skim over:

I don't have much time to go through this section now, so I'll skim over the next few pages and concentrate on explaining the subsequent section.

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Just to be pedantic: I don't know a lot about horsemanship, but as I understand it, a canter is not just a slow gallop, it is a different gait, involving different combinations of the horse's hooves being on the ground at any given moment. It is normally faster than a trot and slower than a gallop. –  Jay Mar 23 '12 at 20:18
    
You are correct, but I thought the approximation given by Dictionary.com was close enough for the purposes of this answer. –  Daniel Mar 23 '12 at 21:23

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