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Consider:

The executive director presented to the board her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds.

This does not read well and moving to the board would be a natural thing to do,

The executive director presented her final recommendations on fundraising to the board.

if it wasn't for the last part:

The executive director presented her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds to the board.

This, I presume, would introduce an ambiguity (are the funds disseminated to the board?)

Is there a solution?

Context (near "Final Gardner recommendations published").

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It's largely a matter of style how you phrase this. There would be no ambiguity in your third version when spoken - and as J.R. points out, you'd trivially indicate this using commas if you really thought it might be misunderstood. Though frankly I think it would be a perverse interpretation anyway, to suppose any such board would be sharing the fundraising proceeds amongst themselves. –  FumbleFingers Mar 17 '12 at 17:56
    
So is it really the ambiguity in the NP of what is presented? That is, 'her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds to the board.' the meaning could be that the recommendations are to the board vs. the dissemination is to the board. Is that where the ambiguity is? –  Mitch Mar 17 '12 at 18:16
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@FumbleFingers: Perhaps that's a "perverse" interpretation in this context, but that doesn't make the general question any less valid. Consider this sentence, which has the same structure: The executive director presented her recommendations on constitutional changes and the mailing of election ballots to the board. Now, it's not so obvious - was the director talking to the board about mailing ballots to everyone in the company? Or talking about how ballots would be mailed to everyone on the board? –  J.R. Mar 17 '12 at 18:38
    
@J.R.: In the more general sense, vast numbers of constructions (particularly in writing, not speech) are technically "ambiguous". Your commas easily (but imho, unnecessarily) resolved OP's one. Sometimes the only way around it is to rephrase. This particular instance isn't really much of a model for resolving ambiguity in general, but I stand by my first comment that it's a matter of style how OP phrases it, and if he's bothered about the ambiguity - well, just learn to use commas appropriately. –  FumbleFingers Mar 17 '12 at 19:56
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Sometimes it's easier to simply answer a question than pick it apart. In this case, it matters not how the sentence would sound when spoken; presumably, the OP was asking about the sentence when written. (Otherwise, he could have said, "This does not sound right," instead of, "This does not read well," and not bothered to provide a link to a news article where the sentence was taken verbatim.) –  J.R. Mar 17 '12 at 20:08
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5 Answers

You can replace the preposition to with before, which means "in front of" according to Oxford Dictionary. The sentence will be:

The executive director presented her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds before the board.

There is no ambiguity with this change.

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I like Irene's suggestion, using the word before.

In a similar situation, where a preposition change would be less suitable, you could also use punctuation:

The executive director presented her final recommendations on fundraising, and on the dissemination of those funds, to the board.

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In UK English, before would seldom be used in this way. I would prefer the use of the preposition with:

The executive director presented the board with her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds.

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When you present someone with something you usually give it to them, you don't just show them. –  Irene Mar 17 '12 at 12:05
    
I don't see a distinction; her recommendations are given. –  Tony Balmforth Mar 17 '12 at 12:24
    
You might be right. But I've seen (and heard) present with this constuct only when a gift is offered to someone in a formal situation. –  Irene Mar 17 '12 at 12:29
    
I don't know if this is a UK difference that we are addressing, Irene. The construct is common in UK although I would agree that it tends towards the formal (as a board situation might be viewed). –  Tony Balmforth Mar 17 '12 at 12:39
    
I agree it is a common UK construct (I can't speak about American English, I know only what I hear in films and read in books). So far I'd connected present someone with something with award or gift offering in formal situations, but then again my experience might be more limited than yours. –  Irene Mar 17 '12 at 12:50
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To the board, the executive director presented her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds.

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In a presentation before the board, the executive director detailed her final recommendations on fundraising and the dissemination of those funds.

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