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Please consider this sentence in which I am using having:

Having full driving licence, life insurance, 5 year driving experience and never have an accident, I am great driver.

Is this use of having correct in explaining that I have this, this and this? If not, please show me how to write such a sentence properly.

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closed as off topic by Will Hunting, RegDwigнt Mar 8 '12 at 20:46

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Perhaps fix the "and never have an accident" part of question, to avoid distractions. (Eg, "and having never had an accident") –  jwpat7 Mar 8 '12 at 20:17
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thanks jwpat7, can you PLEASE give me full sentence example. Do you mean to use Having twice in sentence ? –  Patti Mar 8 '12 at 20:20
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Thanks again. I am new to this site and neither can accept comment as answer nor can like your comment. Can you pleas put it as answer. Thanks –  Patti Mar 8 '12 at 20:25
    
Yes, have done so, and deleted extraneous comment. –  jwpat7 Mar 8 '12 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would write (for example)

Having a full driving license, life insurance, 5 years of driving experience, and having never had an accident, surely I am a great driver.
-or-
Having a full license, life insurance, 5 years experience, and no accidents, surely I am a great driver.

Some differences depend on locale, such as driving or driver's and licence or license. Also, "I am a great driver" is likely to be seen as conceited or facetious.

Regarding your specific question ("Is this use of having correct in explaining that I have this, this and this"), your usage of it was mostly correct, but the last clause of the list had a problem. For more about parallelism in lists, see (eg) english.purdue on Parallel Structure, or a Parallelism webpage at kentlaw.edu.

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