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I want to provide a reader with a link to an article and say that we would agree on a lot of points therein. What's the best way to state that and which one in the below versions is correct?

I can see us agreeing on many points in the article.

or

I can see us agreeing on many points from the article.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Either is fine, as they are synonymous.

The only difference I detect would be that "from" maybe emphasizes that the points stand on their own, outside the context of the article.

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Either would be acceptable. The points are in (contained in) the article, and also from (coming from) the article. Between the two, I would choose in, since it doesn't put unnecessary emphasis on coming from. Though if I were saying the same thing, I would probably say:

I can see us agreeing on many points which that article made.

Making use of the idiom to make a point.

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Both phrasings are acceptable, but neither is something I'd choose to say. For the first, "us agreeing on many points in the article" suggests to me that we somehow agree "in the article", rather than on points presented in the article. The second form has a similar problem. I would instead use wording as follows.

I can see us agreeing on many points given in the article.
I can see us agreeing on many points stated in the article.
I can see us agreeing on many points taken from the article.
I can see us agreeing on many points of the article.

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