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I'm a non-native English speaker, and my automatic spellchecker seems to accept both therefore and therefor. Is one orthography preferred ? Is that a British vs. American difference ? Or an old vs. more recent orthography ? Or something else ?

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closed as general reference by Cerberus, FumbleFingers, RegDwigнt Feb 20 '12 at 22:20

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

You could look it up: –  JeffSahol Feb 20 '12 at 17:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 41 down vote accepted

Therefor means for that.

For example:

Here we sell guitars and accessories therefor.

Therefor is one of a whole series of adverbs: thereof (of that), thereafter(after that), therein (in there), etc.

If you are familiar with German - the Germanic sister of English - you can find a direct analogy there:

for = für

therefor, for that = dafür (literally, therefor)

Therefore, as you must know, means as a (logical) consequence

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+1: that's the only way I could make sense of dafür, davon, darauf, etc. in German class –  Jason S Feb 20 '12 at 18:32
Great answer! +1 –  Marco Demaio May 2 '14 at 15:41

Therefore and therefor are completely different words.

Therefor, an archaic word, means "for this", "for that", or "for it". E.g;

... ordering goods and enclosing payment therefor.

Therefore means "for that reason" or "hence".E.g;

Those people have their umbrellas up: therefore, it must be raining

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I wouldn't say therefor is archaic. Its usage is not uncommon, especially in legal documents. –  Armen Ծիրունյան Feb 21 '12 at 11:59
This answer explains the difference more directly than Armen's answer. –  Mike Kormendy Mar 2 '14 at 3:30

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