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I have a tiny table/bulletin board to display information for all members to remind them of their deadline task. They work for one large project, each is assigned to code for a specific thing. Which correct word should I use as the table's title?

Project Deadline / Task Deadline / Assignment Deadline / Job Deadline?

I don't know about how your company's team works on a project (member job dispatch). Because in my company it is done so, in case of one member who might keep pace with others or times when he can't code before deadline, it's problematic, right? How to solve this?

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I don't understand the "Because in my company ... right?" question. If you mean "How are missed deadlines handled?", that will be off topic here and need to be edited out of question; if you mean what is something called, edit question to clarify the issue. –  jwpat7 Feb 17 '12 at 7:35
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5 Answers

Project / Task / Assignment / Job

The way I see it, a project is comprised of several tasks, and each task becomes an assignment after it has been assigned to a specific individual or team. (Job is better applied to each employee's position in the company).

With that in mind, I think assignment is the proper word for your bulletin board.

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Task Deadline should fit most conveniently in your case.

The word task may have very narrowly defined meaning in some contexts (Projects consist of sub-projects consist of modules consist of tasks consist of sub-tasks ...).

However, in general usage, it is bandied about for anything of any size/ description at any level. (Project Manager's task is the Project; Analyst's task is a module; Programmer's task is a section of code ...).

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I can suggest, Task Board if you're focusing on Task Allocations to different team members. You can specify the tasks, person to which it is allocated currently and the discussed deadline. I would not prefer using the word Deadline as the headline of your display board. I prefer usage of Task over Job or Assignment in such cases (We do have such a display board in our project for tracking tasks)

You might also call it Work Product Status Board or of you want a broader term, why not simply call it Dashboard, and then specify Tasks along with deadlines.

You can specify the Deadline for Project as header or footer item on your board, so that everyone knows what's the overall end date for the project.

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Everyone is best suited except job dead Line.Job is a continuous process.And we use deadline for only limited amount of time.Project will be complete with in time so it has dead line.

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You could label the table with one of the following:

  • Best Before - Well-known store phrase, used in indicating when an item expires, or "goes off"; by extension, a date by which a project element had better be done.
  • Due Dates, Drop dead dates, etc. - If an individual missing a deadline slows down the whole project, Drop dead dates would be a reasonable name.
  • Task Schedule - If deadlines are more like guidelines than hard limits, term schedule might be better than deadline. Among other meanings of schedule are "A timetable, or other time-based plan of events; a plan of what is to occur, and at what time" and "(computer science) An allocation or ordering of a set of tasks on one or several resources." Your task schedule could include a Due Dates column, a Grace column, and a Drop dead column.
  • Timetable, "a structured schedule of events with the times at which they occur". If your schedule is less than structured, you could label the table Circus or Merry-go-round or Rat race.
  • Critical path or critical dates - A critical path is "the sequence of dependent steps that determine the minimum time needed to carry out an operation." If delay on one worker's part delays the whole job, his or her task may be on the critical path and should be completed by some given critical date.
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