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A couple of weeks back I read the story 2 States: The Story of My Marriage by Chetan Bhagat. In the story, I found a weird phrase: testosterone-charged men. What is the etymology of that phrase testosterone-charged men?

"I’d have much preferred her place, as I didn’t want her to be the only woman in the dorm with twenty testosterone-charged men"

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2 Answers 2

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The only citation including it in the whole of the Oxford English Dictionary is dated 1997. Testosterone itself is the anglicised form of German Testosteron, first recorded in 1935. That in turn is a combination of testis ('testicle') and sterone ('formative element in the names of some steroids').

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:Thanks for your quick response..I just found the general meaning of that word..But i wondered,Is there any slang meaning of that word?? –  Vijin Paulraj Feb 1 '12 at 8:12
1  
@VijinPaulraj: None that I know of, but it's an expression that might sometimes be used with humourous intent. –  Barrie England Feb 1 '12 at 8:20

But i wondered,Is there any slang meaning of that word??

Testosterone is a hormone. Although it exists in females as well, it is regarded by the general public as a hormone responsible for male-style behaviour. Wiktionary lists the literal meaning of the word, and then the figurative meaning of the word:

  1. (biochemistry, steroids) Steroid hormone produced primarily in the testes of the male; it is responsible for the development of secondary sex characteristics in the male.
  2. (figuratively) Manly behavior, often of an aggressive or foolishly reckless nature. Mother encouraged James to rely more on intelligence and less on testosterone to deal with the neighbor's son.
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