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What I actually mean what's the conjugation of the verb wonder. For example:

I wonder, thou wonderest, etc..

including past, ing form, etc.. (it will actually help me with other verbs too)

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Is there something special about 'wonder' that you've noticed is different from the way others verbs are conjugated? If so can you give an example in your question? –  Mitch Jan 27 '12 at 16:06
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closed as general reference by JeffSahol, RiMMER, Jon Purdy, FumbleFingers, Mitch Jan 27 '12 at 21:19

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

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Past: wondered, thou wonderedst

Present: I wonder, thou wonderest (rarer: wonderst), he wondereth, we wonder, you wonder, they wonder

Participle: wondering

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how about "Have you been wondering?" Would it be, "Hast thou been wondering"? –  user1135588 Jan 27 '12 at 16:34
    
@user1135588, I think so, or maybe "art thou been wondering" — or something else. Not sure. –  msh210 Jan 27 '12 at 16:39
    
@msh210: "Art thou been [anything]" is gibberish. "Hast wondered?" would have been fine, since "hast" already implies second person singular subject. –  FumbleFingers Jan 27 '12 at 17:18
    
@FumbleFingers so how about "ye" and "them" Is it used like today? –  user1135588 Jan 27 '12 at 17:25
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@user1135588: Erm... we don't use any of those archaic pronouns today. But it would have been "Hath ye wondered?". And "them" (which is still current) is the object form, not subject of a verb. Unless you have a very good reason for wanting to learn the archaic forms, I really do suggest you steer clear of them and just learn current English! –  FumbleFingers Jan 27 '12 at 17:34
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