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I first learned drop on by from this news.

Longhorn Aquatics was hosting its New Year's Classic, and Lance Armstrong decided to drop on by and hop in the pool.

What is the difference between drop on by and drop by? What is the meaning of on here?

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I suspect that we get it by evolution from "come on over". –  JeffSahol Jan 24 '12 at 2:44
    
Thanks! What does "on" mean in "come on over" then? –  Tim Jan 24 '12 at 2:47
    
The "on" means "forward" or "ahead" literally, but in the phrase it adds encouragement, like you'd use with a dog for example. –  JeffSahol Jan 24 '12 at 2:57
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Isn't asking such a question a good chance for us to be aware of the regional difference if any? –  Tim Jan 24 '12 at 3:41
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So, @FumbleFingers, "too localized" means "unlikely to ever help any future visitors; only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation...", while "too localised" means "applies to American English"? We need a new choice in the vote to close box :). –  JeffSahol Jan 24 '12 at 13:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since no one else came up with a thoroughly researched reply...

I suspect that we get it by evolution from "come on over". The "on" means "forward" or "ahead" literally, but in the phrase it adds encouragement, like you'd use with a dog for example.

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