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In the Longman dictionary, there is an example for Compensate as follows:

Her intelligence more than compensates for her lack of experience.

I am wondering what the grammatical point of using more than before a verb is here. How does it modify the meaning of verb? Could somebody give another example of such usage?

Update: Does the following sentence have the same meaning?

Her intelligence compensates for her lack of experience more than needed/required.

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In general, action taken to compensate for something implies exactly counterbalances. So to more than compensate means the rebalancing action actually goes further than necessary to equalise the situation. In this specific context, it simply means her intelligence is so high (or highly valued) as a positive attribute that this actually outweighs her negative attribute (lack of experience). Making her "net worth" positive, rather than simply neutral. –  FumbleFingers Jan 12 '12 at 23:04
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It's simply used as an intensifier to indicate that more was done than just the bare action.

Her intelligence compensates for her lack of experience.

This means that her intelligence makes her equivalent to someone who has adequate experience.

Her intelligence more than compensates for her lack of experience.

This means that her intelligence makes her better than someone who has adequate experience.

A separate example:

He cleared the high jump bar with his leap.

This means that he exceeded the height of the bar

He more than cleared the high jump bar with his leap.

This means that he jumped higher than just the height of the bar, probably by a large margin.

Update

Yes, that would be a correct interpretation of the sentence.

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Your update is not correct. The answer is a no to the question about 'more than needed/required.'. Need or requirement is a completely different criterion and is not relevant here. –  Kris Jan 13 '12 at 5:45
    
I accepted your answer. But with respect to @Kris, I doubt your answer to my updated question. –  Meysam Jan 13 '12 at 23:40
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