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I want to be sure of the meaning to "dedication" and "dedicated to" phrases.

I am sure about the inscription meaning, but I want to ask a specific question:

Can someone be "dedicating their comments (positive or negative)" to "some others' activity or thoughts in any form"?

I mean, is there any degree of similarity between "to dedicate" and "to comment on" ?

This is the lastest place to make any English mistake :) Sorry if any exists above.

Edit: I am trying to establish a web site, which will let users to comment on things they see while surfing the net. I am interested in a domain name containing the word "dedication" but I couldn't be sure whether a comment on a video or an article can be said to be "dedicated to" that subject.

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Hi Kerem Ulutaş, welcomer to ELU. The terms "dedicate to" and "comment on" don't really have much of a connection. If you want a meaningful answer, you'll probably need to explain why you think they are related, and what it is about them that you don't understand. –  FumbleFingers Jan 11 '12 at 3:00
    
I tried to explain the situation a bit more, edited the question. Thanks for the welcome :) –  Kerem Ulutaş Jan 11 '12 at 3:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Commenting is something that comes out of the blue. It can be anything; something positive, negative or a neutral statement.

But when you say you are dedicating, the charm and the pleasure of an activity you are involved in is totally attributed to a person/thing you are dedicating to.

So, commenting can be positive,negative or neutral whereas Dedication on the other hand is generally positive.

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This is the point which caused the confusion. The Turkish meaning doesn't necessarily have to be positive in general. It is used a lot, for comments attached to things as well as referencing situations. –  Kerem Ulutaş Jan 11 '12 at 11:51

It would sound odd in your situation: normally, a text is dedicated to a person or cause, but not simply to whatever the comment is about. Saying that my text is dedicated to a cause means, "any good that comes from my text I would like to pass on to this cause", like praise or honour. That doesn't sound appropriate for comments on a video. You could say a comment was attached to the object it comments on.

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Thanks a lot, the confusion made sense to me at first. "Dedication" means "ithaf" in Turkish, which resembles similar meaning to "cited" or "reference". –  Kerem Ulutaş Jan 11 '12 at 11:39

There is no reason why someone can not be "dedicating their comments (positive or negative)".

Practically anything can be dedicated. It is common to hear such usage as 'I dedicate this speech to ...'. If a speech is but a manifestation of one's opinion, so is a comment -- pro or anti.

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Certainly it is possible to dedicate a speech or a comment to somebody (or by transference something): but that isn't what OP was asking about, and it's likely to be more confusing than helpful. –  TimLymington Jan 11 '12 at 15:11
    
@TimLymington If you understood the question correctly, do help clarify, thanks. –  Kris Jan 12 '12 at 4:42
    
Down voters better post a related comment. –  Kris Jan 12 '12 at 9:56
    
I don't actually agree with you ('this is not useful' should be sufficient), but if you want to put that argument meta is the place for it. –  TimLymington Jan 12 '12 at 11:01
    
@TimLymington I conclude that you were not the one who down voted my answer. –  Kris Jan 12 '12 at 12:29

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