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This is a poem Across by Vikram Seth:

Across these miles I wish you well.
May nothing haunt your heart but sleep.
May you not sense what I don’t tell.
May you not dream, or doubt, or weep.
May what my pen this peaceless day
Writes on this page not reach your view
Till its deferred print lets you say
It speaks to someone else than you

I'm having trouble understanding the meaning of the last four lines. Can someone explain the exact meaning of the last 4 lines?

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closed as off topic by Barrie England, Monica Cellio, z7sg Ѫ, KitFox, aedia λ Jan 10 '12 at 17:36

Questions on English Language & Usage Stack Exchange are expected to relate to English language and usage within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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I have voted to close because this is more a question of literary criticism than of English language and usage. –  Barrie England Jan 10 '12 at 17:12
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1 Answer 1

I would rephrase the last four lines as:

I wish that you will not see what I'm writing on this page today, while the times are restless. In due course (but not soon) my verses will be printed and publicly acknowledged, that's when I would like you to read them.

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But also, "lets you say it speaks to someone else", meaning the subject of the poem will distance themselves from the author when they do read it. There is a sense that this distancing, impersonal reading of the poem in print is intended to avoid causing emotional pain. The exact meaning is troublesome and illustrates why these sorts of questions probably don't belong on the site, as Barrie says in his comment. –  z7sg Ѫ Jan 10 '12 at 17:22
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@z7sgѪ: I believe that words written poetically can confuse non-native speakers (I've seen it happening time and time again), that's why I tried to help by giving a somewhat "free" explanation (i.e. not word for word) of the sentences used in the poem. You have given an interpretation I don't disagree with, but I feel it isn't my job to do here. I believe OP must try to decide on the interpretation of the poem, once the meaning of the sentences is clear. –  Irene Jan 10 '12 at 18:15
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