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"This group’s main duties are to carry out information systems audits in Colombian banks and to make research and develop new regulations on information technologies and systems in the banking sector."

Should I put a "to" behind "develop"? Or are any other commas needed?

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I think its correct as it is.It all makes right sense. –  Apoorva Jan 10 '12 at 9:32
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I believe you don't need the word "make" there. –  Interrobang Jan 10 '12 at 9:53
    
We are saying "make research on information technologies...". Shouldn't "make" be there? –  Alk Jan 10 '12 at 10:02
    
Make in the example refers to new regulations: you will be making, researching and developing the regulations. It makes sense, but I would guess that's not what you meant (certainly not in that order). –  TimLymington Jan 10 '12 at 11:45
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

It would better be:

... in Colombian banks, to undertake research and to develop new regulations ...

Note that in your version, and is used twice. Unless you meant to say 'research and development' as a single task, you will have to use a comma as above.

As for the to, yes, it is needed, again unless you meant to say 'research and development' as a single task.


[Edit-1]
On the other hand, if you had meant 'research and development' as a single task:

in Colombian banks and to undertake research and development of new regulations ...

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Yes, research and development as a single task was what I meant. –  Alk Jan 10 '12 at 10:42
    
Oh well, then it's going to be quite different. –  Kris Jan 10 '12 at 10:47
    
Thank you very much. This helped me a lot. –  Alk Jan 10 '12 at 11:12
    
I think 'R & D' should be on a subject. Normally just pedantic,but here of would naturally refer only to development. (which has already caused some confusion). –  TimLymington Jan 10 '12 at 11:51
    
@TimLymington I agree with you. I had indeed thought of this. However, even R&D on doesn't fit at all: it is on for R and of for D :( if you check carefully! We generally skirt the issue by placing the R&D after than before. –  Kris Jan 10 '12 at 11:59

How about "The group's main tasks are (i) to carry out information audits in Colombian banks and (ii) to undertake research and development concerning new regulations on information technologies and systems in the banking sector"? It's unwieldy, but it's grammatical and (if read carefully) unambiguous.
I am guessing to a certain extent what your intentions are, as the original can be read several ways; that is the penalty for using and too much.

Also, I don't personally like the phrase information technologies. Information technology is an idiom for computers and related machines; information technologies would include the fax, the photocopier, and paper and pencil. But this isn't a universal view: if your readers will understand the phrase, by all means include it.

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My readers are a bunch of university professors and information security experts. "IT" would mean the same to them all. –  Alk Jan 10 '12 at 13:55

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