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I'm building a website and its mobile version. In the mobile verison I need a shorter tagline. Initially I wrote: "I do web and graphic design." For the mobile version I wrote: "I do web and graphics."

I would like to know two things:

  • Will the average person understand the meaning of the shorter version?
  • Are many people using "I do web" or "I do graphics"?

(I haven't seen people using it that way but I do know people who write stuff like: VISINOMEDIA - WEB & GRAPHICS).

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'I do' does sound weaker (less professional) than 'I work in' or 'I work with' or 'I create/make'. –  Dreamling Dec 27 '11 at 23:32

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Yes, I believe most people would interpret "I do web and graphics" as being very close to "I do web and graphic design"; the main difference is that the first could also be interpreted as general drawing, photography, etc.

The phrase "I do XXX" is something you won't often see in the professional sphere. I believe the main reason is that it is uncommon to exclude the possibility of there being multiple people working for the service provider when selling professional services; in general "We do XXX" is much more common.

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Well, in the site I state very clearly that I'm a freelancer (and that I work alone) so I guess it is OK. I'm not very sure if people would interpret "graphics" with general drawing. Isn't "illustration" closer to that? –  janoChen Dec 27 '11 at 16:33
    
@user734290: There's nothing ungrammatical about the word "graphics" there, and the meaning is pretty obvious, but as far as I know "graphics" does not identify any specific professional activity - "graphic design", "illustration", "photography", etc do, and could all fall under the same more general "graphics" banner. I wouldn't worry about the ambiguity too much, most things we say in life are ambiguous! I think the intended meaning of your shortened phrase is clear enough. –  Tao Dec 27 '11 at 17:34

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