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What is the difference between the nouns measurement and measuring? Can I say the measurement has stopped the same way I can say the measuring has stopped?

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In addition to accepting an answer, you can also up vote an answer. –  Kris Dec 22 '11 at 12:25
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I tried to but it requires at least 15 reputation. –  ParPar Dec 22 '11 at 13:42
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Syntactically, you have different complements available. The verb measuring simply takes a direct object. The noun measurement and the gerundial noun measuring take PP complements headed by of. Thus you have:

Measuring an elephant is dangerous. (verb)

but:

The measuring of the elephant was fraught with danger. (gerundial noun)

The measurement of the elephant went surprisingly well. (noun)

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One can also say 'Measuring the elephant...' (gerunds are more likely without the article). –  Mitch Dec 22 '11 at 15:00
    
Sure. The determiner isn't relevant. I suppose I shouldn't have given contrasting determiners in the example. –  Brett Reynolds Dec 22 '11 at 16:59
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For one, measurement is a noun, measuring is a gerund.

"the measurement has stopped" refers to the process called measurement.

whereas

"the measuring has stopped" refers to the action of measuring in a modified way, which is why that part of speech is called a gerund.

Both sentences convey the same meaning. However, one refers to an object and the other indirectly to an action.

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Which version refers to an object? Aren't both involving an action? (just looking for a clrification) –  Mitch Dec 22 '11 at 14:59
    
@Mitch: 'measurement' –  Kris Dec 23 '11 at 7:52
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The verb measuring simply takes a direct object. The noun measurement and the gerundial noun measuring take PP complements headed by of.

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