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Examples: I am at a loss who to blame. OR I am at a loss of who to blame. OR I am at a loss on who to blame.

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Like both answers, I prefer at a loss as to what to do, but apparently it's far more common to simply omit those extra two words. –  FumbleFingers Dec 19 '11 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rather than [], [of] and [on], I think it should be [as to]:

I am at a loss as to who to blame.

A clearer way might be to say:

I am at a loss to know who to blame.

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Thank you very much! –  YONG Dec 19 '11 at 12:00

I think to be absolutely correct there should be a preposition, but common usage seems to indicate you can get away without one.

I would tend to say "I am at a loss as to who to blame"

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The Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English gives "at a loss to do sth", which would make "I'm at a loss who to blame" correct, and not only a "get away" thing, wouldn't it ? A google search on "I am at a loss who to" gives lots of hits back. Or could there be a difference between British and American usage? –  Laure Dec 19 '11 at 11:37
    
Thank you very much! –  YONG Dec 19 '11 at 12:00

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