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In Google, if I search for the word alphabeticalized, many links show that there is a word alphabeticalized. But in MS Word 2007 , if I type alphabeticalized then it underlines that word and suggests 'Alphabetical zed' as an option.

What's the correct spelling?

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3  
I think the word you're looking for is Alphabetized. It looks like MS Word is trying to split your word into two correct words. There are relatively few results on Google for alphabeticalized. –  Andy F Nov 29 '11 at 10:09

3 Answers 3

The correct word is Alphabetized. Alphabeticalize or Alphabeticalized is not a proper English word (You can check English dictionaries; it has no entry.). Since MS Word suggests the closest match, it says Alphabetical zed, which has nothing to do with Alphabeticalized.

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The OED gives alphabetize with the two meanings

To express or symbolize by alphabetic letters; to reduce to (alphabetic) writing

and

To arrange alphabetically.

There is no entry for alphabeticalize.

It also records alphabet as a verb, giving Johnson’s definition to range in the order of the alphabet and one of the citations includes the past participle alphabeted.

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I came to english.stackexchange.com to find out why wiktionary thinks "alphabet" is a verb. en.wiktionary.org/wiki/alphabet - I've never seen/heard it used this way (always use alphabetize myself). Is this really a verb, has it ever been a verb? –  Jeffrey Kemp Jul 26 '13 at 2:20
    
It’s rare. The OED’s most recent citation for the verb is this from 1954: ‘Does the sequence of content follow classified, chronologic, . . . or alphabetic order? If alphabetic, are the topics large or small? How are they alphabeted?’ –  Barrie England Jul 27 '13 at 6:00

Urban Dictionary

alphabeticalize

A word that doesn't exist but is commonly confused with alphabetize.

There is no telling if some specialized jargon has defined the word to suit its needs. Which is probably why Google comes up with so many references.

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