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A non-native speaker needs help with the following phrase to be used in the acknowledgments section of a research paper:

"Parts of the this research were conducted during a visit of the International Law Group of Kalamazoo Law School."

All authors of the paper visited that place. I'm especially not sure whether it should be "visit of", "visit to" or "visit at". The length of the visit in question was six months. Maybe I haven't even listed the correct option.

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I think with "visit of" it means that the International Law Group of Kalamazoo Law School visited the authors. –  GEdgar Nov 25 '11 at 2:02
    
@GEdgar: that's what I say in my answer –  RiMMER Nov 25 '11 at 2:05
    
You might also consider adding the duration of the visit into the sentence: '... were conducted during a six-month visit to ...' –  Snubian Nov 25 '11 at 2:10
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Just use "by" for the ones that did the visiting, and "to" for the ones visited. Using "of" for either could be confusing in this construction; using it for both is just ridiculous. –  FumbleFingers Nov 25 '11 at 4:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can write

Parts of this research were conducted during a visit to the International Law Group of Kalamazoo Law School.

In general, you can pay a visit to a person or a place.

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Or you can be visited by a person, visit of which you can enjoy. Do you know what "the International Law Group" is? Because the context doesn't specify that. –  RiMMER Nov 25 '11 at 2:00
    
So your answer is probably incorrect, because you just said yourself that a department of people visited the authors, therefore "the visit of the people." –  RiMMER Nov 25 '11 at 2:05
    
Thank you Jasper, I will go with your proposition and apply your little correction to my sentence. And "Group" in fact refers to "Department" in this context. Thanks to all for contributing so quickly, you really helped me out! –  Steve06 Nov 25 '11 at 17:57
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The visit to this forum (by me) surely paid off and I'll make it my no. 1 place to stop by when I stumble upon problems with the correct use of the english language. ;) –  Steve06 Nov 25 '11 at 18:04

I would simply go with "This work was conducted in part at the International Law Group of Kalamazoo Law School."

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Thanks, this is a very nice suggestion, too. –  Steve06 Nov 25 '11 at 17:52

Visit of sounds like it should be followed by who was doing the visit, for example:

The visit of the president went flawlessly, the president is safe.

Visit at and visit to both sound fine to me, with the minor difference that one of them implies the distance traveled, like in the following examples:

I went to Europe last year. = My visit to Europe last year was great.

versus

I was in Europe last year. = My visit in Europe last year was great.

It's difficult to determine which of these you need in your sentence, as you haven't provided enough context, but what you've currently got there seems correct, apart from a minor article mistake:

Parts of the this research were conducted during a visit to the International Law Group of Kalamazoo Law School.

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Thanks for clearing up the correct use of "visit of". After writing down my suggestion for the phrase, I also had the feeling that I was reversing the roles of the persons involved. –  Steve06 Nov 25 '11 at 17:54

International Law Group is not a place to visit, so I think its better to use something like this,

Parts of this research were conducted with the International Law Group during a visit to Kalamazoo Law School.

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But presumably the research wasn't conducted by anybody but the authors of the paper, so you can't say the research was conducted with the International Law Group, because that would imply that some of the research was conducted by people other than the authors. –  Peter Shor Nov 25 '11 at 2:56
    
Peter is precisely right, "with" would imply cooperation with the group, which was not the case. –  Steve06 Nov 25 '11 at 17:49

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