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Which sentence is correct?

Buy tickets in the comfort of your home

or

Buy tickets at the comfort of your home

I saw the first one written on a hoarding but I feel the second one is more acceptable. Please explain which one is correct and why.

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2  
I would actually recommend "from the comfort of your home" over either of the given choices. –  Hellion Nov 15 '11 at 16:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The preposition is applying to the comfort, not to the location. So it would be:

We ordered in comfort. (correct)

We ordered at comfort.

Another example:

We sat in the light of the moon.

Here it is hopefully more clear that you're talking about sitting in the light rather than in the moon!

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The first is definitely correct.

Although you are AT your home, your are IN comfort.

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I'd say "in my home" too. –  Urbycoz Nov 15 '11 at 15:16
1  
I might say 'in my home', as in inside the building. But you would also say 'at home' where referring to location: 'Where are you?'. 'At home.' –  CJM Nov 15 '11 at 15:27

I've never been invited to do anything at the comfort of my home and don't expect to be.

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I'd would have said too that in the comfort of my home was the correct form. But I googled at the comfort of your home and came upon an impressive number of hits. So it is being used (and not only on sites run by non native English speakers. The thing is when does usage become acceptable? –  Laure Nov 15 '11 at 17:26
    
The thing is, what do you mean by acceptable? :) –  Barrie England Nov 15 '11 at 17:27
1  
Neither the Corpus of Contemporary American English, nor the British National Corpus returns any records for ‘at the comfort of your home’ or ‘at the comfort of your own home’ and nor does nGrams. –  Barrie England Nov 15 '11 at 20:19

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