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I am filling a form for living in the campus on a university in Australia. The due date for sending this application is near, and I have asked the very same question to them in e-mail and haven't got an answer. I fear that I will not get the answer before the due date, so hopefully I have come to the right place to ask this question.

Bottom of the contract it says "Resident initials here", now what's initials? I searched a bit and found out that it's the first letter of my name followed by first letter in my last name and surname.

If my name is Muazam Al Ace, are my initial "MAA"? So do I write "MAA"?

So my question is, are they asking for my signature or initials which does not make sense to me.

One more question: "Resident’s Representative for Notices" - is it here I fill in my parents?

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In this context, your initials are a shortened version of your signature. Generally, you use the first letter of your first and the first letter of your last name as your initials, but you can also include the first letter of your middle name or maiden name, or more than one letter from one of the names (e.g. someone with the last name DiAmico using both D and A). Some people will even combine the letters in a characteristic way, such as writing the initials MR with the R attached to the right leg of the M. –  Marthaª Nov 10 '11 at 17:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An initial is the first letter of a word.

So yes, you're the resident, and your initials are MAA, so write those on the form.

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Thanks, I'll just do it then. –  Muazam Nov 10 '11 at 16:23

This is an old post, just wanted to complete the details since I stumbled upon here: In the forms initials would be: First character of first name, First character of last name, First character of Middle Name.

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At least in the US it would be very unusual to have the initials out of order, like you suggest; First-Middle-Last is how it's done. –  Mark Beadles Jan 18 '13 at 22:02
    
As long as the initials are recognizably connected to you, and you do it the same way each time, you can choose which you please; rather like a signature. –  TimLymington Jan 19 '13 at 10:53

protected by tchrist Jan 19 '13 at 0:10

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