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Is there a generic way to say that an educational resource (an article or a video) has been read or watched by a student and is expected to be familiar to her, like in lessons learnt?

I'm looking for an adjective that can come after is as in is learnt.

Programmers:
Think a database field is_* for a Resource, should also be a good fit for an URL: /resources/*/.

In Russian, absorbed is used in this context but I'm not sure I can say absorbed knowledge without sounding too chemical.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

digested, picked up, acquired, educated, instructed, informed, gained, absorbed, mastered. all of them are synonyms of learned. there might be one you like.

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digested seems like the best fit. Thank you a lot. –  Dan Nov 9 '11 at 22:35
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+1, but for me only digested, picked up and acquired fit the requested form (video is ...). Absorbed and mastered might be used, but only in secondary meanings (which require contex). –  Unreason Nov 9 '11 at 22:41
    
acquired has somewhat commercial connotation to me, which may give an impression the item has been bought. This could interfere with the real commercial features of the website, so I decided not to use it. –  Dan Nov 9 '11 at 22:48
    
What about processed? I processed the article last night. I processed the video over lunch. I do hear people talk like this when they are referring to complex media (documents, videos) but it could sound weird if you work in an office where there is also a lot of editing of media. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 9 '11 at 22:58
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner To me, processed applies more to machine rather than human. Plus, processed could mean either absorbed or discarded. –  Terry Li Nov 9 '11 at 23:59
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You can say that the resource is part of the syllabus and that its content is examinable.

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Consider pre-requisite or required. For example if you want to say that you should have watched or read x, y, and z before taking this course, they are pre-requisites for this course or they are required background for this course. If you want to say that students should watch or read things before trying the midterm, you could say they are required background or required preparation for the midterm.

I would also consider completed, which works well for both courses and modules. I think most people would also extend that for a particular video or paper.

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Throwing in my suggestion with consumable.

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