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The following sentence is from here. It’s too long, and I don’t fully understand it. Can anyone help me parse it?

Simple examples are likely to have far more overhead than the work done making the performance of the concurrent example far worse than just writing it single threaded and also the code more confusing.

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The link has rotted. Please post it again. –  Mark Nov 8 '11 at 8:44
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So has the writer's style. –  Barrie England Nov 8 '11 at 8:49
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All I read was "more confusing" –  Hackworth Nov 8 '11 at 9:42
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'll break it down to short sentences and rephrase:

For simple examples, the overhead of concurrency is likely to be far larger than the actual computation.

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Therefore, solving this example problem concurrently will have far worse performance than solving it with a single thread.

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Multi-thread code is also more confusing to read than single-thread code.

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That sentence should be punctuated as follows:

Simple examples are likely to have far more overhead than the work done, making the performance of the concurrent example far worse than just writing it single threaded, and also the code more confusing.

Like that it makes a lot more sense; describing the problem, an outcome, and a further outcome.

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Here's my attempt:

"Simple examples are likely to have far more overhead than the work done, making the performance of the concurrent example far worse and the code more confusing than just writing it single threaded."

Or in other words:

"This is not worth using for simple examples as it is less efficient and more confusing than writing single threaded."

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The link finally opened on my browser and have slightly edited my second example. –  Matt Nov 8 '11 at 9:20
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