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Is there a single word describing someone who is impossible to live with because of their bad manners?

Such as in the example:

'John, my housemate, has terrible manners; he's an awful person and impossible to live with.'

I thought about using the words 'unlivable person' but that sounds a bit strange to me and it's not a single word.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A person who is hard to put up with may be described as insufferable. A person who lacks graceful behaviour or acceptable/pleasing social skills is uncouth.

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I think this is too broad. You can be insufferable for many different reasons, including being overly meticulous. –  onomatomaniak Oct 22 '11 at 8:29
    
@ onomatomaniak: I've stated that the word refers to someone who is "hard to live with". Going by the italicized part of OP's question, it appears to me he is looking for a concise way to express impossible to live with. –  Autoresponder Oct 22 '11 at 9:13
    
That's fair. I'm not saying it's an inapplicable word; in fact, it's quite a good one. I'm just saying it has a meaning that's broader than "impossible to live with because of bad manners". –  onomatomaniak Oct 22 '11 at 9:16
    
@onomatomaniak Huh? What a strange objection. Almost every word you can think of (except for precisely defined technical jargon) is “broad”. The context narrows the meaning. That’s how language works! –  Pitarou Feb 26 '12 at 3:47
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I'm fond of untoward

: difficult to guide, manage, or work with

and intractable

: not easily governed, managed, or directed

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A great word for a habitually messy person is a sloven.

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