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I found this when learning underscore.js (a programming framework). The introduction says:

It's the tie to go along with jQuery's tux.

Does it mean that it is to be used along with jQuery or is it a replacement to jQuery?

(jQuery is another programming framework.)

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3  
You wouldn't take off your tuxedo and wear just a necktie to a formal ball, would you? Unless they've completely mixed up the metaphor, they mean it should be used alongside jQuery. –  Peter Shor Oct 21 '11 at 21:38
    
It's the belt to go with jQuery's suspenders. –  JeffSahol Oct 22 '11 at 3:53
    
@PeterShor Well yeah, developer might indeed do that. Actually, using underscore.js without jQuery is a valid choice, I believe. –  Janusz Lenar Sep 25 '12 at 13:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A tie may be considered a clothing accessory to a tuxedo, therefore the framework author is suggesting that underscore.js be seen as an accessory or supplement to jQuery.

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If you wear a nice smart tuxedo suit, you certainly need a nice smart tie to go with it.

jQuery is the foundation, and underscore.js is the essential cherry on the cake to complete the picture.

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I'd guess it means 'the simplified or bare-bones version of xxx'. Since it's comparing apples to apples, I'd be inclined to believe it's tux:tie = full:simple.

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