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The melody of the theme song of the cartoon series “Thomas and his friends” matches the scansion of poem X (“March”) of A.E. Housman’s “A Shropshire Lad”. There are five verses to Housman’s poem, but the second one seems especially apt semantically/satirically:

So braver notes the storm-cock sings

To start the rusted wheel of things,

And brutes in field and brutes in pen

Leap that the world goes round again.

Are there any other poems whose scansion matches this one?

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closed as off topic by PLL, FumbleFingers, simchona, Daniel, Mitch Oct 21 '11 at 20:33

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This is a lovely question, but I fear it’s rather off-topic (hence I’m voting to close): it’s a question of literature and poetics, not English usage. If’m not sure I can think of a better forum, but if you find one, please link to it here; I’d love to join a discussion about this somewhere else :-) –  PLL Oct 21 '11 at 19:22
    
Rhyme scheme is very close to being on topic...but possibly not enough. is there a literature.SE? or does writers.SE care about poetry? –  Mitch Oct 21 '11 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

Iambic tetrameter:

A slightly closer to on-topic version of the question might have been: "What is this poetic meter called"? But even that is probably not good for this site.

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