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I want to create a button on an interface that will show me more items (cars) of the same kind (or similar in characteristics).

I was thinking of 'more like this' but this is a bit too long and the interface is already crowded, thus I came up with 'more alike', but I don't know if people understand this.

Alternatives are 'see similar cars' and 'other similar cars' but they are also too long.

How would it be more appropriate to say, in a short form?

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think this is a case where less is more, and you should try with either "more..." or skip the elipsis. If you think it is not explicit enough, maybe you could use "similar cars", either as the actual text or as a tooltip. You can drop see or other without losing any meaning.

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I would go with either "more" or if there is space "see more". –  jimreed Oct 20 '11 at 12:09
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Are you saying 'more' is less is more? –  Peter Shor Oct 20 '11 at 13:34
    
thanks! I ended up using "similar cars" –  Cristian Oct 22 '11 at 19:57
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"More alike" is so confusing as to be wrong, IMHO. Two pictures and a button saying 'more alike' would be comparing not the cars, but the similarities; these two are more alike... than the other two? than they are different? than you'd expect?

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+1 agree, I think. "More alike" means, to me, that these two things are more like each other than those two. Maybe not exactly what Tim is saying, I think, but that very fact indicates that the phrase is confusing. –  JeffSahol Oct 20 '11 at 14:27
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