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In other words, does rhyming work reflexively?

Do "potato" and "potato" rhyme?

Is the following (admittedly cumbersome) limerick valid?

An issue with rhymes confused me much
So I used the internet as a crutch
I went to a site
The Stack Exchange site
And used it as my crutch

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3  
Edward Lear, who popularized limericks, did frequently rhyme a word with itself, but usually in the first and last line of the poem. –  aedia λ Oct 20 '11 at 1:51
    
I wanted to know if a rhyme/Could repeat the last word as a rhyme/So I made up a rhyme/That ended in 'rhyme'/And queried the state of the rhyme. –  Sven Yargs Jul 29 at 16:45

1 Answer 1

By the formal definition of 'rhyme' (matching the last few sounds), yes, a word rhymes with it self.

But to actually use it in a poem is jarring in its lack of imagination. So it violates the rules of artfulness.

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Agreed. In the case of the OP's limerick, it also violates the conventional limerick format. –  Erik Kowal Jul 29 at 7:23

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