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I don't know which is right?

interest ['intrist, 'intər-]

which is right?

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closed as general reference by simchona, Jasper Loy, Hugo, MrHen, kiamlaluno Nov 7 '11 at 19:46

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The OED gives both /ˈɪntərɪst/ and /ˈɪntərɛst/ for the noun and for the verb. From the point of view of your question, that means that, at least in the British speech on which the OED’s pronunciation is based, there is a vowel sound, given here as a ‘schwa’, between the second third consonants. However, to ask what pronunciation is ‘right’ assumes that any particular pronunciation is ‘right’ and that all others are ‘wrong’. I am sure that many native speakers of English will pronounce it as /ˈɪntrɪst/ (or /ˈɪntrɛst/), that is, with no vowel sound between the /t/ and the /r/. They are not to be condemned for doing so.

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I like this answer the best. I say /ˈɪntrɛsting/ sometimes, but I say all three. Good answer, Big Barr- E. –  Wolfpack'08 Oct 19 '11 at 4:23

According to Dictionary.com both are correct. I used the "Listen to the pronunciation of interest" on the website, and two variations can be heard. The origin of the word is:

from Latin: it concerns, from interesse; from inter- + esse to be

Interesse In"ter*esse\, n. Interest. [Obs.] --Spenser.

Personally I use both, although knowing the origin I'm inclined to use the ['intər-] pronunciation.

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