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This is in reference to holding an MLS degree. Am I a "Master"? Would it be correct to say

When I become a Master of Library Science, I would like to...

That sounds somehow kooky, but I can't think of a better way to say it.

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I certainly wouldn't say "When I become a Masters of Library Science", that just sounds ridiculous. –  JakeParis Oct 14 '11 at 1:24
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No. To be a master, you have to catch all 150 pokemon. –  Jordaan Mylonas Oct 14 '11 at 1:54
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yeah, I guess I'm older than you - I was thinking of He-man. –  JakeParis Oct 14 '11 at 1:54
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I didn't even know they offered degrees in "The Universe" –  Jordaan Mylonas Oct 14 '11 at 2:23
    
Unless you are a girl, and then it's Mistress of Library Sciences! –  Nathan Oct 14 '11 at 2:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes. If you graduate with a BSc or BA, you are a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts respectively. Similarly if you graduate with a master's, you are a master, and if you graduate with a doctorate you're a doctor.

But it's fairly unusual nowadays for people to routinely refer to themselves by their academic title, so something like "After I graduate with my master's, I would like to..." might be better.

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It's not unusual for people who have doctorates. –  Dan Oct 15 '11 at 18:26

What about simply:

When I receive an/my/the MSL degree, I would like to ...

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Thanks. That does work... but I guess I would like the text to a little more punchy/personal. To my ear, "becoming" something sounds more dramatic than "receiving" something. –  JakeParis Oct 14 '11 at 1:43
    
More than one PhD has been started because of that. –  Optimal Cynic Oct 14 '11 at 5:05
    
@JMCCreative When I earn or achieve, then. –  StoneyB Oct 21 '12 at 17:32

Instead of "When I become a Master of Library Science, I would like to..." you could write, "As a Master of Library Science, I will..." (or "will want to" instead of "will") or could write "When I attain my advanced degree...".

For advice on writing in "punchy/personal/dramatic" modes, post questions in writers.stackexchange.com, where such questions are more on topic than here in ESE.

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I'm afraid you don't become anything after obtaining a master's degree other than "Someone who has a Master's." When this is relevant, you say "I have my Master's in ". To talk about it in the future, you'd say "After I get my master's, I would like to..."

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Obtaining a master's degree in a field, particularly one with practical applications, an internship, etc. you do become something. You become credentialed for attaining a defined level of expertise. I remember laughing with my friends when we were graduated with Master of Science in Engineering degrees, saying, "I am now a MASTER of Science", though we didn't feel like the master of ANYTHING then! But in a letter to a prospective employer, or an application essay for graduate work, it is necessary to use this sort of stilted language. –  Ellie Kesselman Oct 14 '11 at 9:21
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+1 - When I got mine, I tried to tell my wife and kids that my title was now "Master". I can assure you, it did not fly. –  T.E.D. Oct 14 '11 at 13:30

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