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What would you call 'A person who is ready for support all the time'?

I wanted to write an email and convey to some clients that I will always be there for support, and was stuck when I got to this.

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One common term for such a person is "Boy Scout," but I don't think you'd want to use it in this context. –  oosterwal Sep 29 '11 at 19:03
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not sure if that's exactly what you were looking for, but I would write something like

Please do not hesitate to contact me again if you require further assistance.

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+1 This is simple and clear. –  Hugo Sep 29 '11 at 15:42
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This implies a one-time response ("contact me again"), not "ready for support all the time". –  Andrew Vit Sep 29 '11 at 22:15
    
Andrew, does "Please do not hesitate to contact me any time if you require further assistance" sound better to you? –  Raku Sep 30 '11 at 6:05
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Though the term is rather casual, a "go-to guy" (or "go-to person") is someone who is continuously available for help and support in a professional environment.

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I disagree. A "go-to guy" (or "go-to person") is someone who will have the knowledge to help (with a given class of problems). The terms say nothing about when that help's available. See Macmillan definition and examples of usage in wikipedia articles and Safire article. –  jwpat7 Sep 29 '11 at 16:44
    
"a person to whom one turns for help or support; also called go-to person" dictionary.reference.com/browse/go-to+guy –  onomatomaniak Sep 29 '11 at 19:03
    
I think the perceived conflict arises in that a person is normally the go-to guy in a particular area, rather than some sort of overall support system. Nonetheless, one goes to that person whenever a problem in his/her area arises, and the implication is that they'll be there to help with the problem. If your area is broad, your go-to status is broad, as well. –  onomatomaniak Sep 29 '11 at 19:12
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+1, It's implied that a go-to person is there when you need them. –  Andrew Vit Sep 29 '11 at 22:07
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A generally acceptable phrase for this is on-call.

I am available on-call.

My contract includes 24/7 on-call technical support.

I may have to leave early if my phone rings because I'm on-call.

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Depending on the kind of support you are providing, some alternatives are more appropriate than others.

For generic "technical support", something like this can work: "I will provide technical support and operational assistance through the lifetime of the project. Don't hesistate to contact me with questions, problems, or concerns."

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24h-support-man

(twenty four hours support man)

You can bring this concept to a real plane, with some humour, suggesting on your signature, for example, that you can be called anytime, anyday, 24 hours on day, 7 days on a week, even on weekends. This means full support to me. No lack. Specially if you really know they will never call you after friday 9:00 PM.

Rohit McFlanders

889-7575 - supporting you 24/7.

or something near this. uh.. a remider. Don't do this if you work with ad agencys or film production. They'll call. Probably on Saturday 12:00 AM. :-/

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"24/7 full supporting you" is not correct English. A better tag line would be "supporting you 24/7." –  Codie CodeMonkey Sep 29 '11 at 19:17
    
@DeepYellow Thanks. Should you upvote now? –  H_7 Sep 30 '11 at 11:28
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