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Or would I just use incomplete? Would there be any instance that one would uncomplete?

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Some dictionaries list this as a synonym of incomplete; others do not, but do list uncompleted. Both are adjectives. –  aedia λ Sep 21 '11 at 21:38
    
Also see english.stackexchange.com/questions/40870/… –  nawfal May 5 '13 at 8:36
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closed as general reference by simchona, aedia λ, Daniel, JSBձոգչ, Matt Эллен Sep 22 '11 at 12:14

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The word which means not complete is incomplete.

Although http://www.thefreedictionary.com/ defines uncomplete (adj) as not yet finished:
Ex: an uncompleted play .

the use of uncomplete as an adjective is very rare. I would suggest you to use incomplete or unfinished.

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I think the OP is looking for a verb, that's why he tried uncomplete, as in uninstall or unstar. –  RiMMER Sep 21 '11 at 21:14
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@RiMMER: Presumably this hypothetical verb uncomplete would mean something like "to start, but not finish [something]". We don't have a verb unfinish either, but we do have what looks like a present participle unending for another of these "non-verbs". And of course there is precedent - no-one would dispute that undelete is now a valid verb. –  FumbleFingers Sep 21 '11 at 21:50
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The correct adjective is incomplete. The verb "uncomplete" does not exist. If you want to express that someone took something that had been complete and made it incomplete, you would have to say:

He removed the cog wheel from the engine, rendering it incomplete.

or

She erased her last answer (and now her application form is incomplete).

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Yes, it is a word, but it is uncommon. Less rare is the adjective "Uncompleted".

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