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Possible Duplicate:
“Next Friday” vs. “This Friday”

Consider the following statements:

I'll meet you coming wednesday
I'll meet you next wednesday
I'll meet you this wednesday

All the pages I've seen till now, like this one use next and this, but I don't see anywhere what the coming means.

As I know it, coming wednesday means the current week's wednesday and next wednesday is for the next week's wednesday.

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marked as duplicate by Mehper C. Palavuzlar, Thursagen, kiamlaluno, simchona, Daniel Sep 12 '11 at 19:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I've never seen "coming" without it being "this coming Wednesday" –  simchona Sep 12 '11 at 5:27
    
Shrinath - This is an "Indian English usage" in my experience. Is that where you've heard it too? –  JoseK Sep 12 '11 at 5:29
    
@simchona : Agreed –  Shrinath Sep 12 '11 at 13:31
    
@Josek : yeah :) –  Shrinath Sep 12 '11 at 13:31
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@Shrinath: You're welcome. I hope the answers to that question helps. –  Mehper C. Palavuzlar Sep 12 '11 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Actually, the sentence would be "I'll meet you this coming Wednesday", not "I'll meet you coming Wednesday." The latter sentence is not grammatically correct.

You can think of it as referring to the Wednesday that is coming up ahead. So, "I'll meet you this coming Wednesday" has the same meaning that "I'll meet you this Wednesday" does.

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2  
+1 that's a simple way to think about this –  simchona Sep 12 '11 at 5:28
    
The absence of "this" was really the issue then :) –  Shrinath Sep 12 '11 at 13:33

This weekend can be interpreted to mean either the nearest weekend in the future or the nearest weekend in the past. The context usually clarifies the meaning, but coming or past can be added to help:

The meeting was this weekend.

The meeting was this coming weekend.

The meeting was this past weekend.

In the first case, I'd think that means that the meeting happened over the weekend that just passed, but it might instead mean that the meeting was scheduled to happen a few days in the future, but was cancelled or moved. In the second and third cases, there's no room for misunderstanding; in the second case the meeting must have been moved, and in the third case the meeting has already happened.

I've never seen coming weekend without the this, but it may be some regional variation where the this was dropped.

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