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Is it a valid phrase? Please, accept or reject it. Maybe there is other exact expression.

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today is a lucky day of down-voters :) –  igor Sep 6 '11 at 20:39
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Could you give more context? What concept are you trying to express, precisely? –  krubo Sep 6 '11 at 20:46
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Is there something in particular you are trying to fix? If not, this is a bit too much like proofreading. –  simchona Sep 6 '11 at 20:53
    
@krubo for example, some countryman does not know about a beauties of city life, but (s)he lives in happiness. –  igor Sep 6 '11 at 20:56
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closed as off topic by simchona, Jasper Loy, Thursagen, FumbleFingers, kiamlaluno Sep 7 '11 at 11:16

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your phrase "to live in ignorance of just happiness" is grammatical but doesn't sound quite right. "ignorance of X" means not knowing about X, but I don't think you mean "not knowing about just happiness".

Perhaps you are looking for the well-known English saying "Ignorance is bliss" and the corresponding idiomatic phrase "blissful ignorance". For example, "I'd rather not tell my children about the famine in Somalia; they will be happier to live in blissful ignorance."

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exactly. this is what I want to know. –  igor Sep 6 '11 at 21:03
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