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Can someone tell me whether we should use "at" when we use where:

The design is so unified and everything is at where they should be.

Or it must be like the one below:

The design is so unified and everything is at which they should be.

Also please check the sentences below and tell me whether they are correct.

The design is so unified and everything is located at where they should be.

The design is so unified and everything is located at which they should be.

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I tried to correct your question as better as I could. I changed the title to make it clearer to those who browse the questions. Hope it still works for your question. –  Alenanno Sep 4 '11 at 18:43
    
Thanks Alenanno for fixing things right and better. –  MoonLight Sep 4 '11 at 18:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'm afraid none is correct. You don't need any preposition in that sentence. You could simply write:

The design is so unified and everything is where it should be.

Note that I changed from "they" to "it", because that pronoun refers to "everything" which is singular.

Regarding your edit, I'd say that it's still incorrect. Is there a reason why you need the preposition? If you use it, your sentence only gets more wordy. If you really want to add some other term there, you could write:

  • "...and everything is positioned where it should be."
  • "...and everything is located where it should be."

It still sounds too wordy if compared to the example I gave above, but I also wrote them to show you that even in this case, there is no preposition. Finally, making a quick search of "...and everything is located at where it should be." gave me no results at all.

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What if I said "The design is so unified and everything is located at where it should be." –  MoonLight Sep 4 '11 at 18:46
    
I'll write it in my answer. –  Alenanno Sep 4 '11 at 18:49
2  
@Braveyard The main point is that the idea of "at" is already a part of "where". "Where" basically means "at which place," so you really don't ever need at and where together. –  tdhsmith Sep 4 '11 at 18:53
    
Thanks Lettuce but Alenanno, you haven't mentioned at which. Were they correct? –  MoonLight Sep 4 '11 at 18:56
    
@Braveyard: In that case, it would be incorrect also without preposition, because "where" expresses the location, "which" doesn't. :) –  Alenanno Sep 4 '11 at 18:57

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