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Feline is an adjective meaning "cat like". Then is there an adjective meaning "dog like"?

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closed as general reference by Thursagen, simchona, JoseK, Mitch, Daniel Sep 2 '11 at 16:49

This question is too basic; it can be definitively and permanently answered by a single link to a standard internet reference source designed specifically to find that type of information.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

This is general reference – Thursagen Sep 2 '11 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

"Canine", or if you want to be infuriatingly erudite, you could use the noun "canid" in a metaphorical sense.

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Sorry, you beat me, I didn't see your answer when I was posting mine. – Richard A Sep 2 '11 at 3:09
Forgive me for being pedantic, but canine is actually a subset of canid. Canines are dogs and wolves, canids include vulpines which are foxes. (From the fox avatar, you may understand why I like to make this distinction.) – Kit Z. Fox Sep 2 '11 at 3:14
LOL! Yes, that is probably true in scientific discourse, but i'm sure the word "canine" came before the zoological category "canine". – Kyle Pearson Sep 2 '11 at 3:18
@KitΘδς ...and lupine would be wolf-like. It can be used in many of the same situations as "canine" and is a bit more commonly used this way, but implies a look that is a bit more serious or deadly. – T.E.D. Sep 2 '11 at 13:58
So if you have lupine for wolves and vulpine for foxes but both of these along with dogs are also canines then there isn't a word for dog-like? – mgb Sep 2 '11 at 15:55


canine adj 1: of or resembling that of a dog 2: of or relating to dogs or to the family (Canidae) including the canids

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