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How should I interpret the phrase "no more" in one of Craig David's songs?

or "no more" in the lyrics of the song shall not be deem as a phrase?

Lyrics -- Don't Love You No More:


I’m sick and tired of this silly game

Don’t think that I’m the only one here to blame

It’s not me who’s been going round slamming doors

That’s when you turned and said to me

I don’t care babe who’s right or wrong

I just don’t love you no more


I've checked the answer from here, about usage of "No more", "no longer", "not anymore" , I could understand the meanings when those 3 phrase used in the examples. however I'm so confused about the "no more" used in this song, Is it used grammatically right? and how to interpret its meaning here in the song?

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Possible duplicate of "No more", "no longer", "not anymore". The meaning is exactly the same as the examples in this question. The grammaticality... Well it's old-fashioned, but it's a song, and songs often make use of weird/wrong constructions such as "He go", for example. –  Alenanno Aug 26 '11 at 8:24
    
@Alenanno well, As I mentioned in my query, after checking upon the existing queries,and found the one you mentioned, but still could not solve my confusion and I want to get clear idea and confirm whether it's a possible grammatical way to use it as relected in the song. and thanks a lot for the answers from simchoma and thursagen. –  cat wang Aug 26 '11 at 8:44
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The lyrics in songs are rarely "proper" or "formal" English, and this is one example of that. In this context, the lyric you bolded is saying:

I don't love you any more

This is a double negative, which in English do not "cancel" each other out as they do in other languages (like French). Note that you don't want to write with these in English either. From here:

the usage of double negatives is not considered proper or standard in English.

If you were to use a construction like this in conversation, people might think that you were less educated. For example, the phrase:

I don't got no money

is in the same style as the lyric (double negative using "no" instead of "any") and is a bit jarring to a native speaker.

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I find "don't got" jarring too! –  Waggers Aug 26 '11 at 11:03
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