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I would like to know where the expression "pitch a loaf" came from, what its origin is, and if people really use it nowadays.

I heard it in a movie, and I believe it means to go to the bathroom, by its context; it's just that I have ever in my life heard someone say that.

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2 Answers

I think the phrase you're looking for is actually pinch a loaf. This forum discussed its origins, with one person writing:

Amazingly enough, none of my references give the history of "pinch a loaf." But I'm guessing that the process of kneading and shaping dough gave rise to the expression.

This slang dictionary supports your intuition about what it means:

verb

to defecate.

He's in the bathroom pinching a loaf.

Another slang dictionary writes that the phrase is from 1994.

I have never, however, heard this phrase used. I'm an American English speaker, and at least in my experience this euphemism is not popular.

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The expression means "to take a big crap". For example:

Man, after that McDonalds I need to pitch a loaf.

For the origin, The Phrase Finder forum says:

Amazingly enough, none of my references give the history of "pinch a loaf."

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protected by RegDwigнt Oct 18 '13 at 9:03

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