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I came across the line, ‘I’ve got my fist cocked if you still want to fuck with me’ in the following sentence of the article titled “A Different Kind of Texan” in August 29th New Yorker Magazine.

I checked ‘cock one’s fist’ and ‘get one’s fist cocked’ on Google to find there was no entry of both phrases. I guess ‘get one’s fist cocked’ implies ‘about to punch in the other’s nose’ figuratively. But I don’t understand what the subsequent ‘if you still want to fuck with me.’ Does it mean ‘If you keep bugging me by digging into that subject,’or 'stick around me'?

The text reads:

“On June 17, 2001. On a day that would be known as the Father’s Day Massacre, Perry vetoed eighty-two bills. Perry had been a nonentity during the session - - “It was a power move - -,” Bill Miller, a lobbyist in Austin, told me recently. “It was a punch in the nose, and a ‘By the way, I’ve got my fist cocked if you still want to fuck with me’.” The reasons that Perry gave for targeting many bills were picayune, and his vetoes seemed personally directed at lawmakers, of both parties, who had fallen from his favor.

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Seems like you pretty much have it. –  Daniel Aug 24 '11 at 1:12
    
See also: skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/5907/… (Is a photo of Rick Perry's college transcript authentic?) –  Randolf Richardson Aug 24 '11 at 2:03
    
I don’t understand the subsequent ‘if you still want to fuck with me.’ -- I cannot post this as an answer (because this question is 'protected'), but it means, "if you give me reason to dislike you." The reason for dislike can (depending on the person/context) be any real or (in the case of a bully) any imagined or alleged offence. The actual "reasons" that Perry had aren't specified in the article: it says that he "gave" (or claimed/alleged) reasons that were "picayune", his (real) reasons "seemed personally directed at lawmakers": so it was whatever each had done to "fall from his favor". –  ChrisW Sep 29 '13 at 1:51

1 Answer 1

Having your "fist cocked" implies exactly what you suggest: being ready to throw a punch. (I suspect it relates to "cocking" a gun--though I'm not sure which is the earlier usage).

To "fuck with somebody" implies interfering (at least!) with that person.

The full translation, if it's necessary, is more along the lines of "I'm prepared to hit you (figuratively) if you really want to try to get in my way".

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In addition to having their "fists cocked," a cowboy could also have his "feet loaded" with some heavy shit-kickers (cowboy boots)! ;-) –  Randolf Richardson Aug 24 '11 at 2:16
    
I don't have any special knowledge either, but I'd be very surprised if "fists cocked" didn't derive from the earlier usage in respect of guns. As for "Don't fuck with me", I think "Don't fuck about with me" is another common variant (which OP might have understood a bit more easily, perhaps). –  FumbleFingers Aug 24 '11 at 3:14
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@FunbleFingers. What does OP repesent for? I don't find definition that makes sense on Google. –  Yoichi Oishi Aug 24 '11 at 3:28
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OP = Original Poster. The person who first asked the question. –  Richard A Aug 24 '11 at 3:31

protected by RegDwigнt Aug 25 '11 at 1:46

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