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Context (Abraham Lincoln's First Inaugural Address),

I do not forget the position assumed by some that constitutional questions are to be decided by the Supreme Court, nor do I deny that such decisions must be binding in any case upon the parties to a suit as to the object of that suit, ...

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

"Suit" here means the case broguht before the court -- a "lawsuit".

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When Abraham said "suit" here, he may have meant suit as in high-ranking executive in an organization. If you read past the sentence wich you gave us, it reads as this:

-nor do I deny that such decisions must be binding in any case upon the parties to a suit as to the object of that suit, while they are also entitled to very high respect and consideration in all parallel cases by all other departments of the Government.

as you see here, when he said suit, it may have been representing the South and the North, since it is said: the object of the suit.

Source: http://www.bartleby.com/124/pres31.html, Paragraph 26

http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/suit

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No, definitely not. He's talking about lawsuits and how decisions upon them should be binding to those involved in the lawsuit. I doubt that "suit" in terms of an executive was in use then, as there weren't many executives, and practically everyone wore a suit. It wouldn't be til later when most people dressed casually while only businessmen wore suits. –  Phoenix Aug 20 '11 at 2:16

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