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In sentences like "Go home," the 'You' is implied, as in 'You go home.'

What would be the implied words/full form of the sentence "Poor you"?

It certainly isn't "You are poor."

** I am editing this question to clarify what I'm looking for - I know what the meaning of this sentence is (both meanings and the difference). I'm merely curious as to how to write it out with the verb so as to make it a grammatically complete sentence. Just like 'Go' would be 'You go.' **

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In poor you, the meaning of poor is "To be pitied." In you are poor, the meaning of poor is "With little or no possessions or money." They both mean "You are poor," but with two different meanings for poor. Don't ask me why this happens. –  Peter Shor Aug 11 '11 at 15:08
    
I know.. that's why I said the last sentence;just in case anyone suggested the impoverished meaning. –  Akin Aug 11 '11 at 15:12
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@Akin: Wait, "go" as in a command, or imperative is a complete sentence. And it's a grammatically complete sentence. Furthermore, "go" and "you go" are two different tenses, (in this case) the former being the imperative and the latter being the present. If you're asking about the etymology, that's another thing, but hinting that "go" is not grammatically complete is not correct. –  Alenanno Aug 11 '11 at 15:37
    
@Alenanno, could you post this as an answer? It's a better explanation than any of the answers so far, IMO. –  Marthaª Aug 11 '11 at 16:54
    
@Peter Shor: Your literal interpretation will be valid in some contexts - but certainly not all, and probably not even most. Whether used sarcastically or in genuine sympathy, "Poor you" mostly is equivalent to "You poor thing!", meaning either You have my utmost sympathy, or Get over it! according to context. –  FumbleFingers Aug 11 '11 at 17:00
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd guess it's implicating something like:

(I pity the) poor you!

The "poor you" seems to be used like an object here.

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Yes, this is probably what I was searching for. –  Akin Aug 11 '11 at 20:11
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"Poor you" is grammatically complete. Despite what you learned in elementary school, there is no minimum standard for syntactical completeness. Really.

Here's an analogous construction:

I went and stuck a fishhook through my thumb. Stupid me.

Here, were you to render the second sentence as "I am stupid" it would take on a somewhat different meaning. "Stupid me" is calling yourself stupid. "Poor you" is calling someone poor (often sarcastically).

"Poor you" may be construed as an ejaculation of sorts:

ejaculation [ɪˌdʒækjʊˈleɪʃən] n 1. an abrupt emphatic utterance or exclamation

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Under suggestion I'm posting this comment as an answer. I'd like to add that I ignore the etymology of the expression "poor you" or the variant "poor thing" and so on. I searched them but couldn't find anything up to now.

About what you wrote in your edit in your question: "go" as in a command, or imperative is a complete sentence. And it's a grammatically complete sentence.

Furthermore, "go" and "you go" are two different tenses, (in this case) the former being the imperative and the latter being the present tense. If you're asking about the etymology, that's another thing, but hinting that "go" is not grammatically complete is not correct.

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It implies that the person referred to by "you" is unfortunate in some way. For example:

Your barber messed up your haircut the day before prom and now you look like a troll doll, poor you!

The person is unfortunate because of a bad haircut, not because of financial problems. I suppose it could also be written as:

Your barber messed up your haircut the day before prom and now you look like a troll doll! How unfortunate!

or

Your barber messed up your haircut the day before prom and now you look like a troll doll! How unfortunate for you!

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+1 for being the only answer to ignore the largely irrelevant impecunious meaning of poor. –  FumbleFingers Aug 11 '11 at 17:02
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There isn't an equivalent of "go home" for "poor you."
In the first case, go is a verb using the imperative mood, for which the subject (second person) is implicit. In the latter case, poor is an adjective, and you cannot omit you from poor you; it could be poor you, poor me, poor thing, poor little rich boy, etc.

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'Poor' is adjectival in this sense. It would be similar to saying "rich you" even though that's not standard, in American or British English.

In German there is a similar expression "Du armer/arme (lit. you poor)" where the word 'Ding (thing)' is implied.

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