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I recommend you to define those parameters beforehand.
I recommend that you define those parameters beforehand.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? If yes, do they mean the same thing? If yes, which one should I use?

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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following variant is correct:

I recommend that you define those parameters beforehand.

You can also omit the word that, giving the following:

I recommend you define those parameters beforehand.

However, the variant with to is incorrect. The verb recommend always takes either a noun object or a subordinate clause as a complement, never an infinitive.

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Got it. Thanks :) –  Šime Vidas Jul 28 '11 at 16:11
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Actually I believe that both variants can be technically correct, but they are saying very different things, and using the "you to" variant is mostly done as a mistake where "that you" would have been correct.

I recommend that you define those parameters beforehand -> my recommendation (to you) is that those parameters should be defined beforehand.

I recommend you to define those parameters beforehand -> my recommendation (to some other currently unspecified person) is that you are the person best-suited to the task of defining those parameters beforehand.

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+1: Nice point. –  Peter Shor Jul 28 '11 at 16:44
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I think both are correct:

http://oald8.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/dictionary/recommend

recommend somebody to do something We'd recommend you to book your flight early.

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Could you expand what you are saying with examples and explanations. That's kind of the point english.se –  virmaior Feb 5 at 0:46
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