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I am trying to help a friend to write his CV. I don't know which preposition to use in the following paragraph:

Advance Marketing Staff Knowledge & Skills Which Lead To Dramatically Increase In The Branch Customers. And Also Result In Several Competitive Branches In The Same City To Close.

Should result in or result to be used? I feel like it should be result in but I am not sure.

Any suggestions or improvements are also welcome.

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I think this question steers dangerously close to please improve my English. –  FumbleFingers Jul 22 '11 at 23:33
    
@FumbleFingers: come on, it is just an innocent question. anyway can you improve my English . . . .? Just kidding ;) –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jul 23 '11 at 0:43
    
Well I haven't voted to close the question, but it's difficult to ignore the rest of your sentence apart from result in. Inviting replies to the unasked "are there any mistakes in this text?" which the FAQ debars. –  FumbleFingers Jul 23 '11 at 3:25
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Result in is idiomatic and quite acceptable, but rewrite the rest of the sentence:

Advanced Marketing Staff knowledge and skills which led to a dramatic increase in branch customers, and also resulted in the closure of several competitive branches in the same city.

I think past tense is appropriate and it isn't necessary to capitalize every word.

Result to is strange and shouldn't be used.

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Result in means "have a specified end or outcome," which is what you are saying.

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