Take the 2-minute tour ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Which idiomatic phrase can be used to express 'showing all the hidden stuff' (it's supposed that nobody should find that out, some scandal things)?

share|improve this question
add comment

9 Answers 9

Blow the lid off something.

share|improve this answer
add comment

"Spill the beans" or just "Spill it."

share|improve this answer
add comment

Uncover the skeletons in the closet or, similarly, show where the bodies are buried.

share|improve this answer
    
Coming out of the closet. –  Armstrongest Sep 28 '10 at 19:08
add comment

From The Telegraph: "A married magistrate was discovered defrauding a charity she worked for after her lover of 10 years blew the whistle." More common is the noun form: whistleblower.

Do you want to describe an outsider discovering secrets or an insider revealing them? Most idioms that I can think of lean one way or the other.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for raising that crucial distinction between discovering and revealing, which I too think applies to most idiomatic forms. Unearth, ferret/worm out, etc. as opposed to blab, squeal, sing, rat, snitch, split, etc., etc.. As you can probably guess, I also think there are more (mostly negative) ones for the latter! –  FumbleFingers Oct 16 '11 at 15:21
add comment

"Shine a light on" and "Lift the veil" can fit.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The criminal fraternity might say 'peach', 'rat', 'grass' or 'cough'.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're letting someone in on the secret goings-on, you can be said to "open the kimono."

share|improve this answer
add comment

how about unhide all

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.