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I am in the process of writing a paper on Shakespeare's Macbeth, and I want to take a quotation from the following passage:

Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life
And live a coward in thine on esteem,
Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would"
Like the poor cat i' the adage?

However I only want to take the first three lines of the passage:

It is written, "Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life / And live a coward in thine on esteem, / Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would"...

How should I punctuate the end (...)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could punctuate thus:

'Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life / And live in a coward in thine on esteem, / Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would" . . . ?'

It is then obvious that you are quoting a question, but not including the entire sentence.

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Thanks, this makes sense. This is what I'm going to be using for my paper, so I'll go ahead and mark it as the answer. –  Benjamin Manns Sep 28 '10 at 13:06
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