Sign up ×
English Language & Usage Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts. It's 100% free, no registration required.

"Information on something", "information of something", "information about something" — these three usages all sound having the same meaning for me. Are there any differences?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

"On" has the meaning of 'covering' here, as in :

Dealing with the subject of, about, or concerning something.

"Information on something" would be information that is really in-depth, and quite into details. i.e. A study on history, or A book on biomedicine.

"information about something" has the implication that it is information that is a kind of summary about a subject i.e. A brochure will contain "information about something", but you can't really say "A brochure on mechanics." You would use "A brochure about mechanics."

"information of something" used in this way basically means the same as "information about something", but I would using "information of something" for the reason that it could be misunderstood to mean "Information belonging to something".

It would be much better to use "information about something" in this case.

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
"Information of" is not generally used in the same way as "information about". Putting it into Google gets results such as "the personal information of hundreds of people was stolen" (i.e. possessive, as you say), as well as lots of text clearly written by non-native speakers. – psmears Jul 5 '11 at 8:23

It might be a regional thing. I grew up in New Zealand, and for me "information on something" and "information about something" mean the same thing. "information of" means "information belonging to", although not in the strict legal sense of belonging. psmears gives a good example.

share|improve this answer

According to my early editorial training in professional textbook publishing (going back to the late 1970s-early 1980s), "information about" is always preferable to "information on."

share|improve this answer

protected by tchrist Feb 26 at 1:20

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality answers, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site.

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.